Read about the Inter-cultural task force here; download the criteria here.

Criteria summary

IMI Intercultural Competence Specialisation is available to any experienced mediator who is qualified by an Intercultural Qualifying Assessment Program (ICQAP) that has been approved by the IMI Appraisal Committee.  The Appraisal Committee will approve any ICQAP that meets the below criteria.

Index

I. General Requirements

A. Methodology

B. Transparency

C. Integrity

D. Diversity

II. Substantive Criteria

A. Knowledge

1. Cultural Framework(s)

2. Self-Awareness

3. Multi-Cultural Perspectives

B. Skills

4. Communication

5. Preparation

6. Managing Process

Cultural Focus Areas

  1. Relatedness and Communication Styles
  2. Mindset towards Conflict
  3. Mediation Process
  4. Orientation Toward Exchanging Information
  5. Time Orientation
  6. Decision Making Approaches

I. General Requirements

Any ICQAP must meet the following general criteria in order to be able to qualify mediators for IMI Intercultural Competence. Mediators who successfully complete assessment programs may be eligible to be known as ‘IMI Intercultural Mediators’. This is separate to the IMI Certification pathway, which reflects experience rather than specialisation.

A. Methodology

All ICQAPs must implement a performance-based assessment methodology for assessing whether each candidate’s performance meets each of the Substantive Criteria in Section II below.

Comment: The assessments may be based on written material, role-play or live action evaluations, other suitable method, or any combination, and may include videotaped and online assessments such as web dramas, self-assessments, interviews, peer reviews, user feedback and other in-practice skill evaluations.

B. Transparency

The benchmarks and criteria applied by an ICQAP must be published and be openly accessible on the organization’s website. 

Comment: Details of all approved programs will be listed on the IMI web portal www.imimediation.org and will include a direct link to each credentialing organization’s website for that program.

C. Integrity

Each Assessor must have substantial experience of evaluating the performance of mediators and in working in inter-cultural situations. At least one of the Assessors on each Program must be independent of the ICQAP training faculty for Inter-Cultural Certification.

D. Diversity

The ICQAP must be accessible on an equal basis to experienced mediators regardless of their professional affiliations, gender, race, ethnicity, age, religion, sexual orientation or other personal characterization. This should be clearly stated on each ICQAP’s website. 

II. Substantive Criteria

Any training program that offers IMI Inter-Cultural Certification must meet these minimum substantive criteria when teaching mediators inter-cultural elements:

A. Knowledge

1. Cultural Framework(s)

Ability to apply at least one recognized cultural theory in order to identify relevant Cultural Focus Areas for facilitating inter-cultural mediations (See Appendix 1). The theory and approach shall include an appreciation of similarities and differences among cultures.

Comments

  1. Any selected framework should provide suggestions as to how to use culture, and possible Cultural Focus Areas that have been identified using the theory (or theories) taught, while avoiding stereotyping when setting up and participating in mediations. Although there are many recognized and respected theories, the goal is not to learn comparative theories about culture or to master a particular theory. The goal is to be able to apply a selected theory or theories about culture in such a way as to help mediators consider appropriate issues when setting up and facilitating an inter-cultural mediation.
  2. Understanding culturally shaped norms and expectations can help explain parties’ different perspectives and think about possible impasses that these perspectives may create. However, it is important to avoid considering culture as an overly inclusive concept to try to explain all behaviors that individuals may manifest, which may not always be group-related but also can be linked to individual considerations (e.g., age, gender, residence, etc). Mediators should strive to apply their understanding of culture as a tool to understand and foresee possible patterns of behavior while considering mediation as a social process in inter-cultural cases, helping people from different cultures to communicate optimally with one another.
  3. Any discussion of culture in the context of mediat