Just Peace Month 2022 – Call for Mediator Submissions

Against the backdrop of the multiple crises facing us all across the globe, the International Mediation Institute would like to highlight the myriad of ways in which mediators and the IMI community are working on justice, peace-building and overcoming differences in these difficult times. It is all those contributions, big and small, that add up to a more peaceful and just world.  

How have you as a mediator brought hope in times of adversity? Do you have a mediation story of overcoming impasse and/ or healing which needs to be told? Send in your stories about being an agent of hope in times of adversity! Help us spread the word of real stories about peace, justice and mediation.

Express your interest and send us your stories following this link!

Format: video of no more than 5 minutes in length or interview – share your story with our interns in the form of an interview and they will prepare a text for publication!

Deadline: for scheduling interview:  1 September 2022.

Alternatively, send us your video by 11 September.

IMI is a proud part of The Hague Humanity Hub Peace and Justice Community. For more information on the project, and other collaborating institutions, please see: https://justpeacethehague.com/en/.

Pursuant to a Memorandum of Understanding signed with Moot Court Bench (“MCB”), Sri Lanka’s legal advocacy training platform, IMI is providing internship opportunities to the Winning Negotiator Team of the MCB 2022 National Mediation Competition. The volunteer interns are: Santhush Pinto, Valavan Puvitharan, Binuri Weerasinghe and Fathima Amana Mohamed Imthiyas. This project will be implemented by the intern team, overseen by the IMI team – Ivana, Liliana and Amee.

1 thought on “Just Peace Month 2022 – Call for Mediator Submissions”

  1. I have two short stories to share. They have several things in common. Both events took place early in my ADR career; both were in the nature of peace-keeping, as opposed to peace-making; both involved indigenous people, two separate Native American tribes.

    The first event involved a consultation with a governmental mediation authourity in Canada. The government service was engaged in mediating a dispute in tribal lands which spilled over the Canadian/US border. The issue, new at that time, was the establishment of gambling casinos on tribal lands. At the time I was doing a fair bit of work with a wonderful mediator/colleague named Tom Colosi, who had an existing relationship with the government service. During our meeting the government explained their actions to date and frustration in not making greater progress. When asked about participants, the government service said that they had invited elected leaders of the Tribe to the talks. The key was who didn’t participate, in this case traditional/non-elected leaders of the same Tribe. We suggested that the government re-start the process and invite both elected and traditional leaders to participate.

    The second event occurred a number of years later, and involved talks with another Tribe, this one in the US State of California. The Tribe had a long history with government and the alleged taking of tribal water from tribal lands. The Tribe was considering talks and/or court action with the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, a formidable counter-party. During my conversations with Tribal leaders I was impressed with the level of detail the Tribe was seeking regarding their counter-party, including persons who would be involved and likely political and economic imperatives for LA Water and Power.

    What these two stories also have in common is that they reinforce best practices in mediation. First, successful mediation begins by having the right people present and participating in the process. Second, there is no substitute for sound preparation, including efforts to better understand people, needs and interests.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

Shopping Cart
Scroll to Top